Math at Home Math Access for Teachers
and Home Child Care Providers

CME Group Community Foundation

 

 

Number Yard

Children will create their own Number Yard books by drawing the number of objects that correspond
with the number on the page of the book.

 
Content Area Standard Target
  • Number and Operations
  • Algebra
  • Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems
  • Understand patterns, relations, and functions
  • Develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connection
  • Sort, classify, and order objects by size, number, and other properties
  • Connect number words and numeral to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations
  • Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in sets of objects
                    
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Obtain materials Obtain the Materials
 
  • The book, Grandpa Gazillion’s Number Yard by Laurie Keller
  • A pre-made book for each child with the numbers 1-10 on each page.  Write the number in words and numerals.
  • Markers or crayons

 

Note: Small parts create a choking hazard for children. Make sure that all materials you choose to use for an activity or lesson with children meet safety requirements. Small parts are not appropriate for children who are 5 years of age or younger.

   
Introduce the activity Introduce the Activity
 
  1. Explain that you are going to read a story about your crazy grandpa who has a number yard instead of junk yard.  At this number yard, he uses numbers to help people.  Ask the children if they can think of way that numbers might help people. 
  2. Explain that they are also going to create their own number junkyard book.  Invite the children to follow along as you read the story.
   
Engage the children Engage the Children
 
  1. Begin reading the story.  After you read a page with a number on it, pause, and have the children draw an object that corresponds with the number in their in their number book.  For example, after you read the following statement from the book: “You are hungry and stuck on a tall mountain peak? A lollipop NINE can last you all week!”  Ask the children to draw 9 of something they would want if they were stuck on a tall mountain peak.  Continue this throughout the book until their number book is finished.
  2. After the number books are completed, the children might want to dictate and have you write down what they want to say about each page.

Additional Extensions

  • You can also create a number book with large numbers 1-20 on each page.  Instead of having the children represent the number with pictorial objects, the children can create other objects from the already existing numbers.  Incorporate the numbers into their drawing.  For example, the number 8 can become glasses on the face of person.
   
Encourage vocabulary Encourage Vocabulary
 
  • Count – To identify the amount of something by number (e.g., "Count the number of objects needed for the number nine.")
  • Represent – A quantity of something whose characteristics represent the entire batch (e.g., "Draw the correct number of objects that represent the number nine.")

Glossary of MATH vocabulary

   
Make adaptations Make Adaptations
 

Supporting Children at Different Levels

Toddlers   Pre-K

Toddlers may:

  • Have difficulty with knowing number names and understanding the count sequence.
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Pre-K Children may:

  • Be able to successfully represent each number with pictorial representation.

Home child care providers may:

  • Demonstrate what a group of nine looks like using manipulatives, count the manipulatives with the children and then support the children as they draw nine objects on the 9 page.
  • Read the book slowly.  Read a page or two a day and reinforce each number that is being worked on throughout the day. 

 

Home child care providers may:

  • Create a number book with large numbers 1-20 on each page.  Instead of having the children represent the number with pictorial objects, the children can create other objects from the already existing numbers.  Incorporate the numbers into their drawing.  For example, the number 8 can become glasses on the face of person.

   
Books Books
 
  • Grandpa Gazillion’s Number Yard by Laurie Keller (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2005)

   
Music and movement Music and Movement
 
   
Outdoor connections Outdoor Connections
 
  • Get some exercise!  Call out a number and an exercise and have the children do the corresponding exercises to that number while counting along.  10 jumping jacks, run in place for 15 seconds.  All the while, counting as you complete the exercises or the time.

 

   
Explore links Web Resources
 

 

 


 

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