Math at Home Math Access for Teachers
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One Duck Stuck

Reading the book, One Stuck Duck, children will begin to recognize that each number is one more than the one before it and begin to recognize that a growing pattern is one that increases or decreases by a constant difference.

 
Content Area Standard Target
  • Number and Operations
  • Algebra
  • Data Analysis & Probability
  • Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationship among numbers, and number systems
  • Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another
  • Understand patterns, relations, and functions
  • Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data
  • Develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections
  • Understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers
  • Recognize, describe, and extend patterns such as sequences of sounds and shapes or simple numeric patterns and translate from one representation to another
  • Analyze how both repeating and growing patterns are generated
  • Discuss events related to students’ experience as likely or unlikely
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Obtain materials Obtain the Materials
 
  • The book, One Stuck Duck by Phyllis Root
  • Pocket Chart or chart paper
  • 55 small squares of paper or sticky notes
  • Snap cubes
  • Scissors & glue
  • Animal images from One Stuck Duck
    animals

 

Note: Small parts create a choking hazard for children. Make sure that all materials you choose to use for an activity or lesson with children meet safety requirements. Small parts are not appropriate for children who are 5 years of age or younger.

   
Introduce the activity Introduce the Activity
 
  1. Show the class the book, One Duck Stuck.  Look at the cover and let some children make some predictions about the story before you begin reading.
  2. As you read the book, stop and talk about the animals who are trying to help and count them on each page.  After the 4 crickets come to help, stop reading and ask the children, “What animal do you think will come next?”  Field their responses and keep track of the animals they predict.  Then ask, “How many they think will come?”  Again, write down their predictions.  The next page will reveal that 5 frogs that come to help.  Talk about their predictions.  For the ones who guessed that 5 animals would come, ask “How did you know?”
  3. Continue to read, stopping one or two more times to let the children predict and then discuss their predictions.
   
Engage the children Engage the Children
 
  1. Give each child or pair of children 55 snap cubes of the same color.  Explain that you are going to read the story again and they are going to make cube train for each animal in the story. 
  2. Start reading and put 1 square or sticky note in the bottom row of the Pocket Chart and have the children take 1 snap cube for the duck.
  3. Next, place 2 squares next to the first one on the last and next-to-last row of the pocket chart.  Have the children make a stack of 2 cubes and place it next to the single cube.
  4. Continue reading and making the stacks until all 10 are made.  When all the cubes are lined up, smallest to largest, the cube trains should look like a triangle.
  5. Ask the children to look at both their cubes and the chart you have made.  “What do you notice?” (Triangle, stairs)  Point out that the train increases by 1 each time.  Ask: “What would happen if, instead of all the animals working together, a new animal, like a dog, came to help?  How many would need to come?” Explain that they are able to predict because the story follows a pattern. Explain that this is a growing pattern because the numbers get bigger each time and always by one.
  6. Explain that if 13 dogs came instead of 11 dogs, it would not follow the pattern, because that would be 3 more, instead of 1. If thirteen animals came next instead of eleven, it would not follow the pattern, because that would be three more, instead of one.
  7. Give each child a piece of construction paper, a copy of the animal pictures from the book, scissors and glue. Each child should cut the animal pictures apart and then glue them to the construction paper to recreate the growing pattern.
  8. Individually ask the children to tell you about their papers.

Additional Extensions

  • Work backwards in the book.  After increasing the number of animals that come to help, decrease the number of animals by inventing an extension to the story.  Once the story is done and the children have their triangle shaped cube train, tell the children that they animal’s parents are calling them for dinner.  Using the snap cubes and the squares or sticky notes, continue the pattern in descending order.  The cube train should look like a pyramid when you are finished.

 

   
Encourage vocabulary Encourage Vocabulary
 
  • Growing Pattern – A pattern that shows an increasing or decreasing sequence and is used to help children analyze mathematical changes (e.g., "This is a growing pattern because the numbers get bigger each time and always by one.")
  • Predict – To guess what will happen next (e.g., "Can you predict how many animals will come next?")
  • How many – The total or sum (e.g., "Can you predict how many animals will come next?")
  • Increase – Get larger in size or number (e.g., "The train increases by 1 each time.")

Glossary of MATH vocabulary

   
Make adaptations Make Adaptations
 

Supporting Children at Different Levels

Toddlers   Pre-K

Toddlers may:

  • Struggle with the concept of growing patterns.

Vertical line

Pre-K Children may:

  • Already understand the concept of a growing pattern.

Home child care providers may:

  • Read the book slower and when it comes times to add snap cubes, put the book down and help the children with their snap cubes.  Helping them to add the correct amount and line up their cubes in ascending order.
  • Help the children line up the animals in the right order, reinforcing the concept of a growing pattern.

 

Home child care providers may:

  • Work backwards in the book.  After increasing the number of animals that come to help, decrease the number of animals by inventing an extension to the story.  Once the story is done and the children have their triangle shaped cube train, tell the children that they animal’s parents are calling them for dinner.  Using the snap cubes and the squares or sticky notes, continue the pattern in descending order.  The cube train should look like a pyramid when you are finished.

   
Books Books
 
  • One Stuck Duck by Phyllis Root (New York: Candlewick, 2003)

   
Music and movement Music and Movement
 
  • Sing songs about number, such as “This Old Man” or “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe”

  • Sing songs that add one word or action to each verse such as the following chant: “Hey, My name is Joe and I work in a button factory, I've got a wife and a dog and a family, One day the boss came up to me and said Hey Joe, Are you busy? I said no, He said turn the button with your _____.” Repeat verse 6 times. Continue to do each action as you add a new one. 1) Left hand 2) Right Hand 3) Left Foot 4) Right Foot 5) Bottom 6) Tongue.

   
Outdoor connections Outdoor Connections
 
  • Growing patterns is a great cross-curricular theme, especially in Science.  To witness, analyze, and chart how an object changes over a period of time is a comprehensive way in which the children can to link Science and Mathematics. Plant a garden from seeds.  Sprout the seeds indoors (bean plants are good for this)  Observe and chart their growth.  Once the plants are able to be planted, have the children measure and chart their growth.  Keep the plant for the entire cycle and when the plant dies, recycle the plant back into the ground. 

     

 

   
Explore links Web Resources
 

 


 

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